Student Awards

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  • Investigations
    1st

    Jade Moxey

    Sapphire Coast Anglican College, NSW

    Grazing sheep on Deadly fireweed: A "BaaaaD" situation?

    When working on her family farm in Bega, Jade Moxey often sees sheep feeding on fireweed. It made her wonder whether this toxic weed is moving through the food chain onto the dinner plate. Fireweed contains Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids (PAs) which can be toxic. Jade studied whether PAs entered the food chain as a result of sheep feeding on the toxic weed. She conducted blood testing, liver analysis and liver histopathology to determine whether residual PAs were present in the tissue of sheep.

    View Jade's video interview
  • Investigations
    2nd

    Amy Zhou

    Queensland Academy of Health Science, QLD

    Self-derived peptides: inhibition of bacterial growth without resistance

    After a friend’s father died from a bacterial infection that failed to respond to antibiotics, Amy Zhou decided to put her interest in molecular chemistry to work by finding a way to fight antibiotic resistance. The World Health Organisation warns that antibiotic resistance is a major global health threat to the effective prevention and treatment of an ever-increasing range of infections caused by bacteria. Amy found that when the protein structure of Fructose-6-phosphate aminotransferase (GFAT) is disrupted, it is more difficult for bacteria to mutate and there is a lower likelihood of the bacteria developing resistance.

    View Amy's video interview
  • Investigations
    3rd

    Rebekah Kang

    PLC Sydney, NSW

    Slick and clean: An investigation into the use of magnetite in oil spill clean-up

    A quick clean-up of oil spills can reduce the devastating consequences of these environmental disasters on marine environments. Rebekah Kang developed a method for separating oil from water by using magnets, pantyhose and feathers. She found that magnetite granules sprinkled on oil were able to separate oil from water when swept by a device containing a magnet and organic materials such as feathers. She hopes her research could be the basis for a more effective natural clean up method of oil spills in the future.

    View Rebekah's video interview
  • Engineering
    1st

    Justin Mitchell

    St Kevin's College, VIC

    Synth-etic: the world's first 'hood-wind' instrument

    Aside from a love of maths and coding, Justin is passionate about music. He sings with the Australian Boys Choir and plays piano and oboe. So it was perhaps only natural for Justin to use his engineering talents to develop a music device. Justin built and programmed a device stored in the pockets of a hoodie that allows the user to compose and play electronic music. The music can only be heard by the wearer. There are eight keys, four per hand, with the eight notes of one octave scale. His device allows the user to change the pitch of the scale. It has 127 instrumental settings.

    View Justin's video interview
  • Engineering
    2nd

    Declan Predavec

    Mosman High School, NSW

    Hi-Viz bike system

    With cars and bikes increasingly sharing our roads, safety is a major issue for cyclists. Declan, along with his older brother Callum, developed a laser that marks a one metres safety distance behind a bike to help motorists avoid getting too close to cyclists. To create the project they used 3D printing to produce the various devices involved in the laser system such as a warning screen on the back of bicycles that warns motorists if they are driving too close to a cyclist.

    View Declan's video interview
  • Engineering
    2nd

    Callum Predavec

    Mosman High School, NSW

    Hi-Viz bike system

    With cars and bikes increasingly sharing our roads, safety is a major issue for cyclists. Callum, along with his younger brother Declan, developed a laser that marks a one metre safety distance behind a bike to help motorists avoid getting too close to cyclists. To create the project they used 3D printing to produce the various devices involved in their laser system such as a warning screen on the back of bicycles that warn motorists if they are driving too close to a cyclist.

    View Callum's video interview
  • Engineering
    3rd

    Dylan Sanusi-Goh

    John Monash Science School, VIC

    ThermaQuad

    In a world where drones may soon deliver parcels, Dylan has developed a sophisticated drone at a relatively affordable price. His ThermaQuad drone can carry payloads and supports thermal imaging applications. Better yet, his drone costs a fraction of the price of store-bought drones. The Year 12 student’s interests in micro-electronics and aeronautics, led to the development of a drone suitable for practical, real-world applications.

    View Dylan's video interview
  • Innovator to Market

    Amber Kraczkowska

    Pembroke School, SA

    Chocolate garden

    Everyone loves chocolate. But something a lot of people don’t know is that 40 million tonnes of cocoa shells amass every year from chocolate and cocoa production. To determine the most effective composting system for cocoa shells, Amber put cocoa shell feedstock into three composting systems (aerated static pile, static pile and in-vessel) and recorded the temperature moisture levels and microbial activity of the feedstock over 47 days. She then mixed the compost produced from each system to grow lettuce seeds and compared the quality and effectiveness of the different types of compost in producing lettuce.

    View Amber's video interview

Finalists

Investigations

Alexandra Stephenson

Adelaide Hills Home School Group, SA

Vibration damping on the cello by cello mutes

Alexandra’s passion ranges from cellos to maths and science, so it wasn’t surprising that she chose to put these skills to work to analyse the sound waves of a cello. Alexandra analysed the sound of the cello with and without each of the mutes, which are devices put on a cello that reduce the timbre and volume of the instrument. She performed a Fourier analysis on a number of recordings that she made with and without mutes to reveal the underlying pattern of frequencies in the sound spectrum. Alexandra used multiple linear regression to investigate whether independent variables such as mass, width, density and Young’s modulus played a role in determining the sound levels and range of frequencies.

View Alexandra's video interview

Investigations

Angelina Arora

Sydney Girls' High School, NSW

Which bioplastic will win the RACE?

More than 20,000 tonnes of plastic waste are dumped in landfill sites in Australia each year yet we continue to use plastic because it’s essential to our daily lives. With this in mind, Angelina invented not one, but six bioplastics to see which would make the most commercially viable plastic. Using ingredients such as glycerine, corn starch and vinegar, Angelina put the six bioplastics through five tests, including testing for clarity, endurance and decomposition. One of the bioplastics that Angelina developed decomposes 300 times faster than conventional plastic while demonstrating the strength and flexibility that we need from plastic.

View Angelina's video interview

Investigations

Carlos Meier

Homeschool - Danthonia, NSW

Global food security guaranteed? Evaluating the effects of grazing management

Carlos and his project partner Darryl Domer, who both live in a farming community in northern New South Wales, compared two land management methods to test the impact on productivity and pasture health which is essential to maintaining livestock production at sustainable levels. After analysing the data from the 2,300 hectare cattle farm where the 17-year-olds live, Carlos and Darryl found the cell grazing method was more effective. They believe it has the potential to revolutionise global agriculture which is integral for food security.

View Carlos' video interview

Investigations

Darryl Domer

Homeschool - Danthonia, NSW

Global food security guaranteed? Evaluating the effects of grazing management

Darryl and his project partner Carlos Meier, who both live in a farming community in northern New South Wales, compared two land management methods to test the impact on productivity and pasture health which is essential to maintaining livestock production at sustainable levels. After analysing the data from the 2,300 hectare cattle farm where the 17-year-olds live, Darryl and Carlos found the cell grazing method was more effective. They believe it has the potential to revolutionise global agriculture which is integral for food security.

View Darryl's video interview

Investigations

Eloise Deconinck

St Mary's College, TAS

Plastic degradation by endemic Tasmanian Fungi

Plastic waste is a global problem without a simple solution as it can take thousands of years for plastics to break down. Eloise Deconinck studied whether fungi were able to break down plastic polyurethane materials. She did this by using an enzyme the fungi naturally produces to break down lignocellulosic biomass. She tested the fungi and the naturally-occurring enzyme and found there was a measurable effect on the breakdown of a polyurethane medium. This is a great first step towards developing a fast-occurring natural method to break down polyurethane

View Eloise's video interview

Investigations

Emma Johnson

Daramalan College, ACT

Sequestered carbon in 5 year old red ironbark trees at the National Arboretum

When Emma Johnson looks at a tree, she doesn’t just see branches, leaves and a trunk. Emma sees a carbon storage system because trees store carbon dioxide and prevent it from going into the atmosphere. Curious to know how much carbon dioxide is stored in Australian hardwood trees, Emma worked out a formula for calculating carbon dioxide stored in trees by studying the height of red ironbark trees and the diameter of the tree. From there she was able to calculate how much carbon dioxide the tree was sequestering from the atmosphere.

View Emma's video interview

Investigations

Gabrielle Jarvis

Daramalan College, ACT

Mine waste pollution and the macroinvertebrate fauna in the Molonglo River, NSW

There’s no question that mining has a major impact on the environment, but 15-year-old Daramalan College student Gabrielle Jarvis was keen to investigate the extent of the impact. Gabrielle studied the impact of mining waste from a local mine on the macroinvertebrates in the Molonglo River and the overall habitat. The study found that mining had a significant effect on the abundance and biodiversity of macroinvertebrates.

View Gabrielle's video interview

Investigations

Irfan Hrelja

Scotch College, VIC

EGCG inhibition of amylin aggregation

With obesity rising globally and sugar consumption at an unparalleled level, diabetes is a major global health problem. Irfan and his project partner Stone Ke observed the viability of polyphenol ligands in restricting the amyloidosis identifiable in numerous diseases, including diabetes. They focused their research in studying EGCG amyloidosis restriction, especially in the less understood domain of the physical properties of hIAPP aggregation. The project found that EGCG amyloidosis restriction acted as an inhibitor and re-modelling agent of amyloidosis. Their work could be used as the basis for developing treatments for diabetes and a broad range of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

View Irfan's video interview

Investigations

Lachlan Dick

Hellyer College, TAS

Salinity solutions

Focusing his study on the humble Tasmanian potato, Lachlan Dick investigated whether introducing a nutrient to soil would neutralise the toxic effect of sodium in soil to improve crop output. Lachlan found that the introduction of calcium chloride to saline-affected soil improved the growth rate and biomass of potatoes in his study. He also developed a test for farmers to calculate how much calcium chloride to add to soil depending on its salinity level and other factors. Lachlan is heading to university to study chemistry. He hopes to obtain a PhD and work in scientific research.

View Lachlan's video interview

Investigations

Mary-Anne Poyitt

Redeemer Baptist School, NSW

Up the creek

Bushfires and other damage to bushland have an enormous impact on the surrounding environment and the delicate ecological balance. Mary-Anne used ANONA Analysis and the Simpson Index to test species variation in a bushland environment by three measures: the soil type, distance from the creek and elevation from the creek. Her study may help ecologists revive plants near creeks and in other natural environments in Australia.

View Mary-Anne's video interview

Investigations

Naomi Smith

Queensland Academy of Health Sciences, QLD

Investigating the efficacy of P.Aeruginosa in degrading hydrocarbons

Oil spills can have devastating effects on our oceans and fragile marine ecosystems. Naomi tried to find a more effective way of cleaning up oil spills by using the common bacterium of P. Aeruginosa to degrade hydrocarbons that are often found in crude oil such as Xylene, Ethyl Acetate, Paraffin oils and Hexane. Naomi measured a substrate produced through the cells’ oxidizing process and then used this as a marker for degradation.

View Naomi's video interview

Investigations

Rose Weller

Daramalan College, ACT

Three new variations to an arylsulfatase for the detection of steroids

Athletes who take performance-enhancing drugs may not be happy to find out that 15-year-old Rose Weller has found a way to detect previously undetectable steroids. Rose found an enzyme that breaks the steroids apart from their sulfate conjugates in urine samples. Her method would make those steroid sulfates identifiable if the samples were screened in a drug test. Steroid sulfate metabolites make up about half of the metabolites from steroid use and can only be detected if the steroid has been separated from the sulfate group.

View Rose's video interview

Investigations

Stone Ke

Scotch College, VIC

EGCG inhibition of amylin aggregation

With obesity rising globally and sugar consumption at an unparalleled level, diabetes is a major global health problem. Stone and his project partner Irfan observed the viabilities of polyphenol ligands in restricting the amyloidosis identifiable in numerous diseases, including diabetes. They focused their research in studying EGCG amyloidosis restriction, especially in the less understood domain of the physical properties of hIAPP aggregation. The project found that EGCG amyloidosis restriction acted as an inhibitor and re-modelling agent of amyloidosis. Their work could be used as the basis for developing treatments for diabetes and a broad range of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

View Stone's video interview

Engineering

Aisling Mulvaney

Redeemer Baptist School, NSW

Just go

Ticketing barriers are the worst bottlenecks at train stations and can cause congestion among commuters as they wait to swipe their travel cards. Aisling and her project partner Priyanka BC developed a device worn by commuters that emits a signal automatically picked up by detectors in the barriers. Their vision is that swiping electronic cards won’t be necessary in the future because the device will transmit the passenger’s card information the moment a passenger walks onto a train platform or boards a bus.

View Aisling's video interview

Engineering

Alexandra Stephenson

Adelaide Hills Homeschool Group, SA

The tack collector

Elderly people sometimes have poor fine motor skills and mobility issues due to age and illness. Alexandra, a 13-year-old Year 10 student in Adelaide, developed a household robot that she hopes will improve the quality of life for elderly people who often can’t bend down to remove items off the floor. The robot moves around a room picking up small metal objects such as pins, using a magnetic collection unit. The robot’s navigation system is based on ultrasonic sensors that send out pulses. Aside from her interest in science, Alexandra enjoys making lace, crocheting and knitting.

View Alexandra's video interview

Engineering

Helen Zhang

Meriden School, NSW

Built-in solar cover for tablets and phones

There’s nothing worse than running out of mobile phone or tablet battery when there’s no power outlet available. Helen doesn’t have that problem thanks to the solar powered charging system that she invented for mobile devices. Inspired by solar powered calculators, Helen’s device constantly charges mobile and tablet devices when they get a few rays of sunshine on their solar panels. Helen integrated a solar panel into the back of a tablet and mobile case and connected it to a USB output with a charging cable.

View Helen's video interview

Engineering

Macinley Butson

The Ilawarra Grammar School, NSW

Innovation in contralateral breast shielding design for radiotherapy cancer

It’s not often that a Year 10 student carries out clinical trials on a breast cancer device, but that’s exactly what 16-year-old Macinley Butson is doing with the Breast Shield device she invented. Macinley, who hopes to study medicine and specialise as a pathologist, developed an innovative copper device that can be used as a shield for women receiving radiation treatment for breast cancer. The device, which is made from high density interwoven copper scales, protects the contralateral breast from receiving radiation doses. This would reduce the long-term cancer risks to healthy tissue from radiation treatment.

View Macinley's video interview

Engineering

Maddison King

Meriden School, NSW

Clever GIRL (Global Intelligent Rip Locator)

With an average of 21 Australians drowning each year in ocean rips and 90 percent of beach rescues related to rips, many swimmers lives would be saved if they were alerted in advance to avoid dangerous beaches. Inspired by her work as a life guard, Maddison King developed a warning system for rips, powered by the rips themselves. A turbine in her device uses the energy from the rip to power a warning signal to swimmers. Her biggest challenge was making the device waterproof and establishing an anchoring system that would not interfere with the turbine

View Maddison's video interview

Engineering

Priyanka BC

Redeemer Baptist School, NSW

Just go

Ticketing barriers are the worst bottlenecks at train stations and can cause congestion among commuters as they wait to swipe their travel cards. Priyanka and her project partner Aisling Mulvaney developed a device worn by commuters that emits a signal automatically picked up by detectors in the barriers. Their vision is that swiping electronic cards won’t be necessary in the future because the device will transmit the passenger’s card information the moment a passenger walks onto a train platform or boards a bus.

View Priyanka's video interview

Semi-Finalists

Show all semi-finalists

Engineering

Aletheia Yosaviera

Redeemer Baptist School, NSW

Bimanual invasions: A user-friendly platform improving bimanual coordination

Investigations

Alex Titchen

The Hutchins School, TAS

Increasing wind turbine efficiency

Investigations

Amy Mercer

Willetton Senior High School, WA

Dolphin Streamlining

Investigations

Aniruddh Chennapragada

James Ruse Agricultural High School, NSW

Investigating graphene nanomaterials

Investigations

Ash Hodgkinson

Shore School, NSW

The Impact of Gender Bias on Change Blindness

Engineering

Bartholomew Bunk

Daramalan College, ACT

A wind tunnel with laminar airflow

Investigations

Benjamin Bethune

Daramalan College, ACT

Large Galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field

Engineering

Benjamin Smith

Mazenod College, WA

Solar panels that track the sun

Engineering

Brielle McKinley

Willetton Senior High School, WA

Bananalam

Engineering

Bronson Billing

Launceston Christian School, TAS

How Can Fidget Toys Help Special Needs Children?

Investigations

Cassiopeia Middleton

Christian Aboriginal Parent Directed School (Coolgardie), WA

Cow yellow bone marrow: A promising biodiesel source

Engineering

Char Min Ng

Willetton Senior High School, WA

Bananalam

Investigations

Charles Moss

The Hutchins School, TAS

Increasing wind turbine efficiency

Engineering

Charlotte McGilvray

Shenton College, WA

Shopping Trolley Monorail

Investigations

Chelsy Teng

James Ruse Agricultural High School, NSW

Plastic, Permanent Ink and PVA

Engineering

Christie Lim

Shenton College, WA

Shopping Trolley Monorail

Investigations

Claire Josefsson

Methodist Ladies' College, VIC

Electromagnetism and Cloud Chambers

Investigations

Claire Walters

Fintona Girls' School, VIC

Washing Powder: Worth a Pretty Penny?

Investigations

Connor van der Ploeg

Marist Regional College, TAS

Bloomin' algae

Engineering

Crystal Teh

Willetton Senior High School, WA

Bananalam

Engineering

David Ling

Willetton Senior High School, WA

Passive solar atmospheric water reclamation device

Engineering

Dillon Barry

Innisfail State College, QLD

Personal Transporter Cloud Rider Airboard

Engineering

Dominic Cornish

St Leonard's College, VIC

Feed-O-Matic

Investigations

Eleanor Lawton-Wade

Presbyterian Ladies' College, Sydney, NSW

A quantitative study on the effects of rising freshwater temperatures

Investigations

Eliza Martin

Presbyterian Ladies' College, Sydney, NSW

The Effect of Slack Fill in Chip Packets

Investigations

Eliza Otton

Presbyterian Ladies' College, Sydney, NSW

Mulch to Mouth

Investigations

Emma Spurr

Kingston High School, TAS

The Effects of Light and Temperature on Lettuce Germination

Investigations

Fergus Charles

The Hutchins School, TAS

Increasing wind turbine efficiency

Investigations

Firas El-Hawat

Al Amanah College, NSW

Which greenhouse material best encourages the growth of wheat grass?

Engineering

Georgia Hughes

Kariong Mountain High School, NSW

Recycled Water Solar Powered Water Purification System

Engineering

Giacomo Paduano

Mazenod College, WA

Solar panels that track the sun

Engineering

Glen Mather

Innisfail State College, QLD

Personal Transporter Cloud Rider Airboard

Investigations

Hannah McGrath

Mitcham Girls High School, SA

Which wavelengths "see" through smoke best?

Investigations

Himal Pandey

Willetton Senior High School, WA

Southpaw Galactica

Investigations

Hingis Li

PLC Sydney, NSW

Fertiliser and its effect on lake water

Engineering

Hugh Simpson

St Leonard's College, VIC

The Autofiddler Mark2: A Violin that plays itself

Engineering

Isabella Combes

Methodist Ladies' College, VIC

Automated Morse Code Machine

Engineering

Jack Chapman

St Leonard's College, VIC

Feed-O-Matic

Engineering

Jakob Schuster

Brunswick Secondary College, VIC

Remote control and autonomous robot

Investigations

Jamila Newton

Christian Aboriginal Parent Directed School (Coolgardie), WA

Cow yellow bone marrow: A promising biodiesel source

Investigations

Jasmine Pople

Urrbrae Agricultural High School, SA

Drought Response of Two Varieties of Wheat

Investigations

Jennifer Xu

Presbyterian Ladies' College, Sydney, NSW

ProBiotics or NoBiotics?

Investigations

Jessica Nikolovski

St George Girls' High School, NSW

More is more

Engineering

Jock Needham

Daramalan College, ACT

An advance in bridge design: the Brown-Allan truss with haunched girder

Investigations

John Bivell

Fort Street High School, NSW

The impact of mangroves on the turbidity of the Parramatta River

Investigations

Jonas Zimmerman

Homeschool - Danthonia, NSW

Hive thrive: The development and trial of a protein supplement for honey bees

Engineering

Jonathan Green

Bialik College, VIC

FlyPi

Engineering

Joohun Rhee

Willetton Senior High School, WA

Passive solar atmospheric water reclamation device

Investigations

Jordan Voll

Homeschool - Danthonia, NSW

Hive thrive: The development and trial of a protein supplement for honey bees

Engineering

Joseph Davies

LabRats Science Club - Secondary , VIC

Arduino adapter for Raspberry Pi to Mindstorms

Investigations

Joseph Wright

Daramalan College, ACT

Darcy's law and cylindrical rapid gravity filter operation and efficiency

Investigations

Kallen Parsons

Mazenod College, WA

Effect of crops on soil

Engineering

Kate Carey

Meriden, NSW

Electromagnetic security window

Investigations

Kavinya Welikala

Daramalan College, ACT

The effect of adrenaline on the force and impulse of a human punch

Investigations

Kelvin Du

Newington College, NSW

Do warm air dryers in public toilets need regular disinfection?

Engineering

Keshav Mehra

Independent STAV entry, VIC

Lawn cell

Engineering

Kristin Smith

The Essington International Senior College, NT

Observing the Invisible

Investigations

Lakmali Edirisinghe

Gosford High School, NSW

The Effect of Heat on Enzyme Activity

Engineering

Lara Strati

Meriden School, NSW

Flushable Sanitary Pad

Investigations

Larissa Liow

Daramalan College, ACT

Making and testing resistance of auxetic foams

Investigations

Lauren McGrath-Wild

PLC Sydney, NSW

Noise cancellation tiles

Engineering

Leon Paratz

Bialik College, VIC

Shower Heat Exchanger

Investigations

Liam Graham

SHORE Sydney Church of England Grammar School, NSW

How temperature affects the processing speed of a computer chip

Investigations

Lily Yang

Meriden, NSW

Using food waste to remediate soil

Investigations

Lina Cho

Presbyterian Ladies' College, Sydney, NSW

Trash or treasure? The use of risk husk ash as an agricultural fertiliser

Investigations

Maddison Button

Tintern Grammar, VIC

Degree of Unsaturation of Biodiesel

Engineering

Maeve Allen-Horvat

Unley High, SA

Sun smart hat

Investigations

Maeve Grieve

Burnie High School, TAS

Quick Fix for Oil Slicks

Engineering

Margot McKeown

Meriden School, NSW

What Uniform is That? App

Engineering

Marnie Thompson

Innisfail State College, QLD

Personal Transporter Cloud Rider Airboard

Investigations

Max Buntine

St Leonard's College, VIC

Renewable Photovoltaic Battery System

Investigations

Meg Lonie

Loreto Kirribilli, NSW

The effect of temperature on the surface tension of water compared to oil

Investigations

Melisa Denizli

Redeemer Baptist School, NSW

A Seat For You

Investigations

Min Hoo

Queensland Academy for Science, Mathematics and Technology, QLD

Wearing high heels while driving: Is it really safe?

Investigations

Mitchell Derrick

Mazenod College, WA

Effect of crops on soil

Engineering

Mitchell Torok

Rose Bay High School, TAS

The schedule watch

Investigations

Natasha Camer-Pesci

Willetton Senior High School, WA

Dolphin Streamlining

Engineering

Oliver Sprey

Glenunga International High School, SA

3D Chocolate printer

Investigations

Olivia Beck

Presbyterian Ladies' College, Sydney, NSW

Growing Plants under LED light for Space Travel

Investigations

Penelope Casson

Wilderness School, SA

Is the Sun the Main Source of Cosmic Rays?

Engineering

Petar Georgieff

Broughton Anglican College, NSW

Wireless Power

Investigations

Pia Cunningham

Lyneham High School, ACT

Habitat use of predatory avoidance behaviours of bettongs

Investigations

Rhiannon Kumar

PLC Sydney, NSW

Eucalyptus vs Ethanol: Fuel for Thought

Engineering

Rhys Abas

Kolbe Catholic College, VIC

Raspberry Pi Tablet Computer

Investigations

Roha Rasheed

Salamah College, NSW

The Effects of Micronutrients on Lead Toxicity

Investigations

Roshan Prashant

Willetton Senior High School, WA

Southpaw Galactica

Engineering

Ryan Locke

Daramalan College, ACT

The world's first solely solar powered quadcopter

Engineering

Sabiqul Hoque

James Ruse Agricultural High School, NSW

Automated Sprinkler System

Investigations

Sam Watson

Armidale High School, NSW

Lifting Ability of an Artificial Exoskeleton versus an Unaided Arm

Engineering

Sandra Milanovic

Shenton College, WA

Shopping Trolley Monorail

Investigations

Sayo Kokubun

Queensland Academy of Health Sciences, QLD

Role of colour and salinity exposure of algae in the adsorption of copper

Engineering

Sebastian Hagemeyer

Cheltenham Secondary College, VIC

SAWR: Sun Activated Watering Robot

Investigations

Sergio Arellano

Willetton Senior High School, WA

Southpaw Galactica

Investigations

Seth Morris

Mazenod College, WA

Effect of crops on soil

Investigations

Sherie Pan

PLC Sydney, NSW

An investigation into the suitability of crop residues as materials for paper

Investigations

Stephanie Ferris

Glasshouse Christian School, QLD

Inoculation of legumes investigation

Investigations

Tara Jadwani-Bungar

Methodist Ladies' College, VIC

The Effects of Acid Deposition on Wheat Seed Germination

Investigations

Thomas Hardy

Daramalan College, ACT

The Perfect Kick

Engineering

Thomas Kozlowski

Cheltenham Secondary College, VIC

SAWR: Sun Activated Watering Robot

Engineering

Thomas Munyard

Mazenod College, WA

Solar panels that track the sun

Investigations

Thomas Whitelaw

Lyneham High School, ACT

A catchy conundrum

Investigations

Warawut Chomkul

Hellyer College, TAS

C u for coffee

Investigations

William Harris

Wollondilly Anglican College, NSW

Accuracy of data loggers and probes in Streamwatch

Engineering

William Hor

Willetton Senior High School, WA

Passive solar atmospheric water reclamation device

Engineering

Zane Farnum

Rose Bay High School, TAS

The Hêlios Project